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In my previous blog I wrote about the value of failure and how fear of failure prevents us from trying new things, from stretching ourselves. Cialis   fear can show up in every aspect of our lives with corrosive results. I have fears.   Most of all, I fear that I am not making a difference.   When I was working in the pharmaceutical industry, I feared that what I was doing was not as valuable as others’ contribution and, consequently, that I was not as valued. In fact, my efforts were much more centered on the people who worked on the projects than the projects themselves, and without people there would be no projects. My inner critic, my gremlin, otherwise known as Professor NotGoodEnough, kept on telling me I was not cutting it and that what I did was not valuable.   As a consequence, I stayed in my comfort zone and did not attempt those things that could have brought me more satisfaction at work.   [cialis] Now, this does not mean that I did not learn from failure cialis, just that I did not do it consistently. Small failures built up my inner critic.   Whether it came from experience in college or even earlier, I don’t know.   What I do know is that learning to recognize when the inner critic tells me to be afraid is not easy.  It takes energy to silence this inner critic.   Just like any habit we want to break, learning to stop listening to the inner critic takes practice. Think of learning to silence the inner critic as exercise for your soul. Most of us do not cialis master a new skill the first time we try it. Start small. Think about something you fear doing. Notice the messages that your inner critic is giving you and when he shows up:

  • What are they based on?
  • What evidence do you have for what he is saying?
  • What evidence do you have that what you hear from him is not true?
My guess is that if you think hard you will find that there is more of the latter than the former. A coach can be extremely helpful here, helping you find, name and banish  your inner critic or gremlin. Working through this process myself,  I realized that what I did was, indeed, highly valuable. Though I may not have generated new drugs, I helped the people who did become more successful. Today many of these individuals are at work at pharmaceutical and biotech companies advancing science and medicine.  And I contributed to their development in ways that I could not have done had I focused strictly on the projects. As a coach, I continue develop people by helping them identify those fears and worries that keep them from being their best selves.   It’s important and meaningful work, and I love it.   Fear can keep me from putting myself in front of people and from conveying my interest in helping them live to their potential.   I am still learning to stop listening to my fears. Professor NotGoodEnough, be quiet! You are not needed now. What would you attempt if you learned to stop listening to your inner critic?


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