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When I started this series on the five essential skills for successful, I did not know how I would write about the last skill, Storytelling. This last skill is possibly the most difficult to master.   We can all recognize a good story.   We may not, however, be able to put our finger on exactly what made it good. Quite by coincidence, I went to see a movie yesterday that truly illustrates the power of story telling and the skill of a good storyteller.   I saw Spielberg’s Lincoln, based on one of my favorite books, Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Three powerful storytellers came together here: Spielberg, the master filmmaker; Kearns Goodwin, a historian who makes history come alive with her narrative skills, and, of course, their subject, Abraham Lincoln who was known for his mastery of this skill and his ability to use it to engage and persuade. A powerful story engages the listener; it hooks her in right from the first sentence.   The story then keeps her listening through artful description, and then creating suspense or expectation. Lastly, it offers a resolution that ties together everything that went before.   If the story uses humor, so much the better since humor also creates a positive framework. For these reasons, stories persuade.   They help the listener put himself in the picture, and connect with the central idea or moral in a way that stating the facts or the rules simply cannot do. It is no wonder that ethics and religious principles are taught through fables and stories. When interviewing, the ability to explain experiences through stories helps a candidate be memorable. When the interviewer reviews the capabilities and experience of several candidates, she is more likely to remember those that told their experience in the form of stories rather than those that simply related facts and figures. Hence the structure of the STAR stories:  1) a problem to solve, 2) the reasons to solve it, 3) the way it was solved and 4) the results obtained. The hook is in the way the problem is stated: it has to resonate with the interviewer – for example by using an image or metaphor can help here.   The actions have to be clear and stated briefly.   It is possible to lose the listener here; stick to the key actions rather than a listing of minutiae.   The results have to be powerfully stated, preferably with facts and numbers and must clearly relate to the original problem.   The story will not hang together if it ends with wishy-washiness.   The outcome must be a resolution of the original problem or a discovery that could viagra in india not have otherwise been uncovered. Think about those people who tell good stories and ask yourself these questions?  How did they hook me? What images or metaphors did they use?  How did they bring it all together? When preparing for an interview, practice telling your stories in this way. Viagra in india   tell your story to a friend or partner and ask their opinion: were you able to hold their interest?  did the story come through clearly? were you able to convey ideas through the images or metaphors you used?  how did the stories hold together? of course, like the other four skills, these have far wider application than job interviews.   They are essential skills for connecting with others, whether in business or in personal situations.   Think through how you [viagra in india] demonstrate confidence, listen viagra in india, create a connection, ask powerful questions and tell stories.   You will find that as you improve your abilities in these five skills you will engage in more fulfilling relationships and achieve greater success.


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